Herbal Solutions to Puerto Rico's Economy

Rastafari inspirationEver since the Federal Reserve Board produced a report that detailed the economic woes of Puerto Rico, I've been getting a pretty steady steam of news stories sharing that information. Like, from here, here, and here, to share just a few. Of course, for those of us that actually live here, we didn't need the Federal Reserve Board to tell us things are bad here. With another raise in the price of milk, the recent rise in the price of rice (a staple for most Puerto Rican families), and the root of evil, the rising price of gasoline; believe me, we know things are bad all too well.

So it was with curiosity and a self-centered hope that someone had a vision to help, that this week I read an editorial from Rogelio Figueroa, the President of the newly formed Puerto Ricans for Puerto Rico. In the editorial, entitled "The Best Economic Tool", he shared his answer to our economic problems. For those of you that might not be aware of this, Figueroa is a candidate for Governor of Puerto Rico in the upcoming November elections.

What I learned from the article, which came as a surprise to me, was that Figueroa seems to be part of the Rastafari movement. Yes, often times the religious inclinations of a political candidates can enter into the public eye, through very unintended actions or statements. Such is this case with Figueroa. Why do I think that he might be a Rastafari?

Well after the reading the editorial, he must be smoking something to believe that creating separate and exclusive lanes for a new fleet of buses to use on our highways will make a significant impact on our economy. Yeah, he has a vision all right, but I'm afraid it is a psychoactive filled set of hallucinations. I mean don't get me, wrong, it's not that his ideas are bad ones, like the drug that inspires the Rastafari, they are just a little too flowery and difficult to accept for the majority of people. Sure I'd like to see a significantly improved and accepted public transportation system. Sure I want the Autoridad de Energia Electrica to produce magnitudes more electricity from renewable sources, and sure I'd love to be able to deduct my mortgage payment completely from my planilla. But call me a pessimist, but those solutions seem unworkable in the Puerto Rico I've come to understand in these last 14 years.

New Puerto Rican Coffee ShopHe did propose one thing that got me thinking: tourism. Now stay with me here, I'm thinking outside of the box. Now if we accept that Figueroa might be a Rastafarian, there may be a way to explode the tourism industry here in Puerto Rico. And as is customary here amongst the economic development community, I'm going to use another country to illustrate how this idea can work. In this case, I'm thinking of Amsterdam, Holland, which is known to attract a lot of tourists to its "red light district." This idea will also prop up the local agricultural community at the same time.

So what if we decriminalize marijuana and make it legal to sell and consume in Puerto Rico. We get local farmers to use the perfect habitat that we have in Puerto Rico to grow the finest herb in the world, and then sell it in "coffee" shops. This will have the secondary effect of significantly reducing the drug trafficking of marijuana and cause crime and plummet.

I'd like to thank Figueroa for connecting the dots for me. If it wasn't for his hallucinatory rantings I would have never had the inspiration for this controversial economic development proposal. And inspiration, after all, is what we want most of our leaders, so kudos Mr. Figueroa. Kudos, indeed! Now, I wonder if he'd also turn me on to his connection, because he's definitely got it hooked up on some stink weed.

Flickr Creative Commons Contributors Today: Eric Caballero and Simon Davison

2 comments:

Gabriel

29 de abril de 2008, 04:57
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dijo...

Can you imagine what would happen if they discover they can get good ethanol yields from hemp?

Anónimo

14 de octubre de 2008, 16:57
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dijo...

Imaginese un Puerto Rico sin IVU para toda la vida,piensen cuanto dinero ahorraremos